Molong to Cargo
Orange NSW. 8.1°C

Molong to Cargo

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Home  -  Things to doCyclingMolong to Cargo

Distance
Distance

69.1 km

Sealed Road
Sealed Road

43.5 km

Unsealed Road
Unsealed Road

25.5 km

Difficulty
Difficulty

3 - Tough Gig

Terrain
Terrain

Undulating

Time
Time

3.5 Hours

Average Speed
Average Speed

20 km/h

Climb
Climb

10.8 (m/km)

Climb
Climb

745m

Descend
Descend

680m

Min Elevation
Min Elevation

432m

Max Elevation
Max Elevation

652m

At a Glance

Two route options are available to riders:

1. Almost 70km of cycling on a combination of sealed and gravel roads, whilst experiencing the friendly places of Molong, Manildra, Cudal and Cargo.  This is the primary route, and the graphics and metrics on this page relate to this route.

2. Almost 65km of cycling on sealed roads, whilst experiencing the friendly places of Molong, Manildra, Cudal and Cargo.

N.B.  During our harvest season (which varies each year but typically runs from late November to late December), these roads may be shared with heavy vehicles as part of this busy and critical time of our farmers' year.

Sensory Engagement

Landscapes and vistas between 4 local towns and villages are a feature of this route, making it a perfect day to capture photos.  Riders will enjoy agricultural variety, including cattle, sheep and alpacas, as well as stunning canola crops in spring or the seasonal cropping of wheat.   The views towards Mount Canobolas play tricks in our minds as we think we are miles and miles from Orange, yet in reality riders are never more than 40 km as the crow files from this thriving regional city.

What’s the best bike for this route?

There are around 25.5km of unsealed road surfaces on this route, and about 43.5km of sealed roads.  Gravel and hybrid bikes are probably the best choice for this ride, with most riders choosing tyres above 32mm.  Riders on e-bikes will have an advantage on the climb out of Molong.

There is an alternate route for riders on road bikes (sealed roads only), with a link to the Ride with GPS map included here, and described within the Course Notes below.

Route Difficulty

This ride is rated as 3 on a scale out of 9, or a “tough gig” as it is a solid hit-out for most people.

Disclaimer: This trail has been developed with the support of local cycling enthusiasts, The Treadlies to showcase some of our region’s most picturesque rides. Orange360 recommends that visiting cyclists review road, weather and seasonal farming conditions before they embark on their ride. Riders embark on their adventure at their own risk.

Something for everyone, on and off the bikes

Manildra is the home to the largest flour mill in the Southern Hemisphere and the oldest picture theatre in Australia.

Orange 360 showcases the natural beauty of this gorgeous Region.  Set in the heart of Wiradjuri Country, people can explore historic sites, wineries, cideries, towns, villages and events all year round.  Catering for all forms of experiential adventurers, there is something for everyone on and off the bikes.

The welcoming warmth of our locals in cafes, restaurants, pubs, B and B’s and farm stays will add to the highlights of your adventures on this route.

Check out the Orange 360 website to explore the locations and local events on offer for when you are riding this section of the Orange Villages Bike Trail.

Course Notes

There is a cue sheet for this route on Ride with GPS, including cues and distances that align with the descriptions below. Note that this section includes 2 route options: an all-sealed-roads route, and a route that combines sealed roads with gravel roads.

Today is a longer journey with ample time to stop and enjoy the beautiful farming country, towns and villages on the way to Cargo. The ever-present vista towards Mount Canobolas is a feature of this route.

Riders start in Bank Street near the railway station, and ride up the main street to Edward Street and turn right, then left at Hill Street which is also the Mitchell Highway. Ride north along the Mitchell Highway and turn left at Castle Street (1.6km) which is also the start of Banjo Paterson Way.

For gravel cyclists leaving Molong, there is a steady uphill climb to Nyora Lane (3.5km). Take this left turn and ride on gravel to Spring Vale Lane (5.8km) where riders turn right and return to Banjo Patterson Way (7.7km). Turn left onto Garra Road (7.9km) and cyclists will enjoy the views and a fabulous downhill ride to Manildra, turning right at both Packham Drive (19.7km) and Kiewa Street (28.2km) to arrive in the town centre (28.7km). Take care riding through the flour mill precinct.

For road cyclists leaving Molong, there is a steady uphill climb for 4 km to Garra Road (5.8km mark for road cyclists). Turn left. Garra road takes you to Manildra. After going 1 km beyond the Garra village turn right onto Packham Drive (17.6km) and ride on to Manildra (26.7km).  Take care riding through the flour mill precinct.

Manildra is the site of a large flour mill so be aware of heavy vehicle traffic.  Coffee and toilets are available on opposite sides of the main street in the village. After a short refreshment break, the gravel and road cycling route options continue from Manildra.

Gravel cyclists complete a short lap of the town and then leave Manildra via Kiewa Street and then the Old Orange Road to the railway line. Turn left (31.2km) and ride east along Henry Parkes Way towards Orange. There is a gentle 5 kilometre climb before riders turn right onto Scenic Drive (35.4km) that takes you to Cudal. This gravel road is one of the features of this route, providing a postcard view of Mount Canobolas to the east and timbered ranges to the west.  The farmlands in between provide a glorious colour palette to the riders at any time of day. At the T-intersection with Kurrajong Road (44.8kms), turn left and enjoy the downhill ride into Cudal (47.7km).

Road cyclists leave Manildra and ride to the west towards Parkes along Kiewa Street/Henry Parkes Way. Turn left at Boree Street (27.2km), cross the railway line and onto Yellow Box Road. Ride on to Kurrajong Road (31.9km), turn left and follow this road through to Cudal (41.3km).

The Platypus Café is a great place for coffee and food, with public toilets just across the road at Landauer Memorial Park.  After another short refreshment break, the gravel and road cycling routes continue from Cudal.

All cyclists pedal along Main Street/The Escort Way and then turn right at Wall Street before heading out of town on the Davy’s Plains Road. All cyclists continue along this road, turning right at the intersection with Gavin’s Lane and riding on to the intersection of Davy’s Plains and Bowen Park Roads. Gravel and road cyclists then part ways until regrouping in Cargo.

Gravel cyclists turn left onto Bowen Park Road (53.2km) and ride alongside Bourimbla Creek for just over 4km before turning right into South Bowen Park Road (57.5km). This is a beautiful section of gravel road with a slight uphill gradient, which has some fabulous views and is a great way to round-out this section of the ride. It also goes past the Pioneer Brewing Company’s rural home. Riders return to Davy’s Plains Road (68.1km) and turn left to ride into Cargo to finish the ride.

Road cyclists turn right (46.9km) and continue along Davy’s Plains Road passing Tamburlaine winery along the way. It’s an easy ride to Cargo with a moderate hill just past Nanami Lane for the last 3 kilometres before riders complete this ride (63.1 km).

There is a café on the left and the famous Cargo Inn on the right. Lunch is available at the café until 2 pm.  Accommodation can be arranged at the Cargo Inn with a booking. Meals are available at the hotel. Best check the local websites and social media pages, with venues also accessible through the Orange 360 website.

Gravel distance is 69.1 kilometres. Sealed road cycling distance is 63.1 kilometres.

Disclaimer:

This trail has been developed with the support of local cycling enthusiasts, The Treadlies to showcase some of our region’s most picturesque rides. Orange360 recommends that visiting cyclists review road, weather and seasonal farming conditions before they embark on their ride. Riders embark on their adventure at their own risk.



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